EarthEcho Expeditions: What's the Catch? Trailer

Join us on our 2019 Expedition: What's the Catch? Journey with Philippe Cousteau and the EarthEcho International team to learn more about fisheries and what we can do to help.

What’s the Catch?
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EarthEcho Expeditions: What's the Catch? Establish Our Fisheries

Philippe Cousteau travels to Plymouth, England, one of Europe’s largest seafood exporters, to explore fisheries and the impacts these practices can have on the environment. Philippe joins Dr. Martin Atrill from the University of Plymouth out at sea to use a trawl net for a fish survey and to understand how data is collected and fish populations are monitored. Fish require balanced and healthy ecosystems in order to thrive and feed our growing population. Philippe joins Dr. Abigail McQuatters-Gollop to learn more about plankton the base of the food web that supports all fish.

What’s the Catch?
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EarthEcho Expeditions: What's the Catch? Fisheries Impact

Fish are a major food source for many of the world’s population, however, many fishing practices can be detrimental to the environment. One of these negative impacts is called by-catch. Philippe travels to the Plymouth Fishmarket to learn about quotas and how this can impact fish populations. Different fish species have different life cycles and histories, which is something that also needs to be taken into account in order to properly manage fish stocks. Impacts from mismanaged fisheries can be seen around the world, Philippe sets out to find out what is being done to protect this vital resource.

What’s the Catch?
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EarthEcho Expeditions: What's the Catch? Managing Habitats

Philippe Cousteau explores juvenile fish habitats. Marine biologists, Tom Stamp, and Dr. Ben Ciotti show Philippe how different habitats can be monitored. The use of nets, acoustic telemetry, sampling and more are used to monitor habitats, like estuaries. Learn how protecting these habitats, where fish spend their early years, is crucial in ensuring fish populations for future generations.

What's the Catch?
What’s the Catch?
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Youth In Action: Ella’s Plastic Clever

Meet Ella Turns, an 8-year-old from England. Ella has taken her favorite hobby, paddleboarding, and turned it into a way to keep her local waters clean. She cleans up marine debris, including fishing nets and ropes. Ella has also created a program where local businesses have eliminated their single-use waste, like plastic bags. She leads Phillipe on a paddleboard clean up in the bay.

What’s the Catch?
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STEM Career Closeup: Louise Firth

Dr. Louise Firth is an ecological engineer. She designs habitats that help organisms thrive in man-made habitats, such as sea walls. Dr. Firth does not have a typical day, she can be found lecturing, during fieldwork, engineering habitats and more.

What’s the Catch?
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Youth in Action: Deep’s Action for Conservation

Meet Deep Shah, a young man who lives outside London. Deep volunteers with the organization Action for Conservation and works to empower other young people to take action for the environment. Deep shares his work with Philippe, including his recent work on an oyster bed restoration project to help provide habitat for juvenile fish and other organisms in Hampton, England.

What’s the Catch?
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STEM Career Closeup: Loveday Trinick

Loveday Trinick is a schools officer at the National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth, England. Loveday educates the young people who visit the aquarium about our ocean planet. Learn more about the average day of a schools officer, including leading dissections and more.

What’s the Catch?
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STEM Career Closeup: Abigail McQuatters-Gollop

Dr. Abigail McQuatters-Gollop is an Associate professor of marine conservation at the University of Plymouth. She is also a plankton ecologist, she helps policymakers work with scientists in order to properly manage the ocean environment. Dr. McQuatters-Gollop combines her research with conservation and science communication to make a difference.

What’s the Catch?
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STEM Career Closeup: Thomas Stamp

Thomas Stamp is a marine biologist and Ph.D. student at the University of Plymouth. Tom studies how fish, specifically sea bass, move in and out of habitats during their life using acoustic telemetry. He uses this information to help fishermen and policymakers make educated choices on fishing.

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